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Weekly News Digest

January 18, 2024 — In addition to this week's NewsBreaks article and the monthly NewsLink Spotlight, Information Today, Inc. (ITI) offers Weekly News Digests that feature recent product news and company announcements. Watch for additional coverage to appear in the next print issue of Information Today. For other up-to-the-minute news, check out ITIís Twitter account: @ITINewsBreaks.

CLICK HERE to view more Weekly News Digest items.

OpenAI Details Its Approach to Upcoming Political Elections

OpenAI issued a blog post about the 2024 election cycle, stating, “Protecting the integrity of elections requires collaboration from every corner of the democratic process, and we want to make sure our technology is not used in a way that could undermine this process.”

OpenAI continues, “As we prepare for elections in 2024 across the world’s largest democracies, our approach is to continue our platform safety work by elevating accurate voting information, enforcing measured policies, and improving transparency. We have a cross-functional effort dedicated to election work, bringing together expertise from our safety systems, threat intelligence, legal, engineering, and policy teams to quickly investigate and address potential abuse.”

For more information, read the blog post.

'Best of CES 2024: ZDNET Editors' Top Picks'

ZDNET provided coverage of CES 2024, the annual tech event, throughout the show, Jan. 7–10. Three ZDNET editors chose the top products, saying that “we … wanted to give you a list of our absolute top picks from CES that we think will be most worth your hard-earned money when they launch in 2024. And naturally, we also wanted to highlight the best innovations—products that you may not buy but are worth knowing about because they could influence other products that you may want to bring into your life in the future.” Their picks include the best TV, best laptop, best AI device, and best tech accessory.

For more information, read the article.

Sage Makes More OA Journals Available on ResearchGate

ResearchGate and Sage expanded their partnership to more than double the number of OA Sage journals that are available through ResearchGate’s Journal Home platform. A total of 100 journals (both frontlist and backlist) now have their content automatically uploaded to Journal Home as it is published. Journal Home features dedicated journal profiles, journal branding on all associated article pages, and visibility for journal communities. Articles will be automatically added to authors’ profiles on ResearchGate, and they’ll see readership and citation data.

ResearchGate and Sage initially partnered in January 2023.

For more information, read the press release.

Taylor & Francis Throws Its Weight Behind DOAB's PRISM Peer-Review Initiative

Taylor & Francis is one of the first large publishers that has signed on to support “an initiative to boost researcher confidence in open access (OA) books and promote better understanding of the role of peer review. Peer Review Information Service for Monographs (PRISM) provides a standardized way for publishers to present information about the peer review processes for their titles on the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) platform.”

The press release continues, “All Taylor & Francis OA books, including those published under the Routledge and CRC Press imprints, are peer reviewed by experts. PRISM makes information about the peer review process easily available to DOAB users, including details about when the review took place (such as at proposal stage) and the type of peer reviewer (for example, by an external reviewer).”

For more information, read the press release.

IMLS Plans Jan. 23 Webinar to Share Findings From the First National Museum Survey

IMLS “will release the results of its pilot National Museum Survey (NMS) during a webinar on January 23, 2024 at 2 p.m. ET. Speakers will highlight how the successful completion of the pilot serves as the foundation for the first-ever annual federal survey to gather and share data about the essential work happening across the country in museums and cultural institutions.” NMS will launch a free database of statistics on museums and related institutions in early 2025.

Register for the webinar, IMLS National Museum Survey Pilot Summary Findings.

For more information, visit the webinar’s webpage.

CLOCKSS and the Global LOCKSS Network Are Preserving OECD iLibrary Content

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) is using CLOCKSS and the Global LOCKSS Network to facilitate the long-term preservation of the books, journals, datasets, working papers, and other materials in its iLibrary, which is used by 2,500 institutions around the world, serving 7 million-plus users in more than 100 countries.

For more information, read the news item.

U.S. Copyright Office Makes a New Rule for the Copyright Claims Board

The U.S. Copyright Office announced via its NewsNet notification system that it “is adopting a final rule amending the procedures for ‘smaller claims’ proceedings before the Copyright Claims Board. In response to public comments, this final rule modifies a rule published on May 17, 2022.” Smaller claims are those seeking damages of $5,000 or less, and the final rule states, among other clarifications, that claimants may change from a smaller-claims proceeding to a standard proceeding, or vice versa, before the initial notice.

For more information, read the news item.

BBC Provides Update on the Aftermath of the British Library Cyberattack

Noor Nanji writes the following in “British Library Starts Restoring Services Online After Hack” for the BBC:

The British Library’s main catalogue, with more than 36 million records, is returning online on [Jan. 15, 2024] after last year’s cyber attack.

It is the first significant step in the complete restoration of services for those using the UK’s largest library.

But the catalogue will just be available in a ‘read-only’ format. …

The hack on 31 October resulted in the British Library’s website being down for almost a month. …

[R]eaders will also be provided with access to most of the library’s key special collections, including the archives, manuscripts and other unique items but will need to come in person to consult offline versions of specialist catalogues.

For more information, read the article.

ALA and Library of Congress Will Create Primary-Source-Led Book Series for Students

The Library of Congress and ALA Editions are co-publishing a new educational book series, Discover and Learn With the Library of Congress, which will combine “facsimiles of primary sources from the Library’s unparalleled collections with background information and teaching strategies” for “teachers, librarians and home educators working with grades 6-12. Organized thematically around topics frequently taught nationwide—and designed to support state curricula and teaching standards—these accessible resources will provide proven, student-centered, inquiry-based strategies for teaching with primary sources. Selections feature perspectives and voices that are often missing from typical textbook narratives and reflect best practices in information literacy by providing source citations, information about the sources’ origins, and guides to additional online resources.”

The first book in the series, The Civil Rights Movement, will publish in late 2024.

For more information, read the press release.

The New York Times: Tech Updates for 2023 and What Still Needs to Be Fixed

Brian X. Chen writes the following in “The Tech That Needs Fixing in 2024, and What Got Fixed Last Year” for The New York Times:

Tech companies would like us to believe that their products tell a story about progress. Faster phones! Better cameras! Brighter screens! Yet despite all the improvements, there are pieces of tech that have been flawed for years. …

To give credit where it’s due, there were some improvements last year that were big wins for consumers. … With the start of a new year, let’s look ahead at the tech that needs improvement this year and reflect on the solutions we found in 2023.

For more information, read the article.



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